What to do if you have been raped

  • If your health is at risk call emergency services on 999.
  • If you are able to - get yourself to a safe place.
  • Is there someone you trust you can contact to help you?
  • Is there someone you can ask to stay with you or you could stay with if it makes you feel safer?
  • You may need to go to the casualty department at your local hospital to check there are no internal injuries.
  • Do you want to report to the police - 999.  This is entirely your decision but if you do then the sooner you do it the better.
    • The police will usually come to you if you don't want to go to the police station.
    • If you can, don't shower or bathe before going to the police.
    • Keep all the clothes you were wearing at the time. These may provide valuable evidence.
    • Try not to disturb any evidence around the scene of the incident.
    • If you contact the police they will arrange for a forensic examination to take place. You can ask for someone to accompany you.  Forensic examinations normally take place at the Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SARC), also known as Grange Park.
  • You may want to contact us for support and information.
  • You may want to consider the need for emergency contraception - The NHS website for Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent provides more information on how to access emergency contraception services.
  • You may want to see your own doctor.
  • If you are able to write down as much as you can remember about the circumstances of the assault.
     Remember: You can consider contacting the police at any time.
  • If you are female, there is still time for emergency contraception.
  • You may want to consider the Independent Sexual Violence Advisor (ISVA) support.  This will help you to identify your needs and signpost for services.
  • Give yourself time - try to take things slowly and think about what you want.  Respect your own judgement.
  • Contact us if you want information.  We can help with health, contacting the police or support/counselling.
  • It is never to late to tell someone what has happened to you.
  • You make want to make an appointment for the Genitourinary Medicine (GUM) clinic - a confidential service which deals with sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV.  You can go to any clinic (it does not have to be your local clinic).  The information does not go on your medical records unless you are referred by your GP.
  • Consider contacting us or another agency for support or counselling.
  • It is never to late to tell someone what has happened to you.
  • Contact us if you want information or support.
  • You can still consider contacting the police.  Even without forensic evidence they can still investigate the crime.  If you would like us to, we can support you to do this.
  • You may still have concerns about your health - see the information above for appropriate contacts.
  • Remember you know yourself better than anyone and know what is best for you.
  • Some people find that writing down their feelings or drawing helps them feel better.  Don't feel bad if you feel angry or sad.
  • Try not to be pressurised into physical and sexual contact before you feel ready.
  • Do think about accessing counselling or support.  It can help to talk to someone outside your close circle of family or friends.
  • Try to explain to the people around you what you want from them, for example, to just listen or to give you some time alone.
  • Sometimes people access counselling several times but are unable to attend the appointments for lots of reasons.  Rape crisis workers understand this.  Please do try to contact again.